Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Simplicity 2418, for the Challis Chalet

I really want to make a 40s shirtwaist dress out of one of my luscious lengths of challis, but Mitch's pants get priority over all the things. Still, I didn't want to miss out on the fun at the chalet, so I thought this top would be a quick project that would work well in challis.
Oh wait, did I say quick? Somehow I neglected to consider the fact that this pattern is cut on the bias. Given the inherent slippy and slidey ness of challis, cutting it on the bias is asking for trouble...
Despite the fight I had with the fabric, the resulting top is rather nice. The pattern is one I've used before, Simplicity 2418. That time I made it out of silk charmeuse. I really am a glutton for punishment.
I didn't make any fit changes from the last time I made it, so I will refer you to that post for the details on fit. I did add an inch to the length, which makes it 3 inches longer than view B and 1 inch shorter than view A.
This is really the only picture that shows the fabric well. Sorry for the crap photography. I'm without the good camera at the moment, and the iPhone isn't a fan of the overcast skies we have. Anyway, I really love the way this print plays with the bias elements of the top. The yoke is actually cut on grain, but the fabric is printed with the dominant "stripes" on the bias, so it sort of tricks the eye.
I'm still hoping to make my challis shirtwaist, but I'm glad I got at least one challis garment made this month. I know this top will be a big player in my wardrobe, if Spring ever comes to the Salt Lake Valley. You can't tell from the pictures, but snow is falling.

Before I close, I want to share an idea I've had. I feel like the sewing community has given me so much, I want to share a little back. So from here on out I'm going to end each post with a little tip that relates to the project. Some of them will probably be "duh, Katie, everyone knows that.", but hopefully I occasionally I'll share something that someone finds worthwhile. For today, I want to share my thoughts on shoulder yokes. If ever you are making a blouse or dress that has a yoke (the shaped strip of fabric that goes over the shoulder), you have an opportunity to really bring your garment to the next level by lining the yoke. I've noticed that fewer patterns include this, and it saddens me, as a lined yoke provides a beautiful interior finish, as well as providing structure in the shoulder of the garment. Lining a yoke isn't difficult and only takes a few more steps than attaching it unlined. I think it is well worth the extra effort.
Here are the steps I took to line the yoke of this blouse. I'd happily write you a tutorial, but I always use the one that kbenco wrote and I don't think I can do it any better, so I will refer you to her blog for the full process.

26 comments:

ladykatza said...

I LOVES IT! Very nice indeed. You should sashay a victory lap around the gardens. *nods*

Anonymous said...

Your blouse looks great - way to boss the hateful fabric into submission!

I love a nice clean finished yoke. That's a great tip that everyone should be taught or reminded of! =)

~ Brooke

JMac said...

Beautiful blouse and a great first tip!

Anonymous said...

Very nice. Hope spring finds you soon so you can wear it.

Anonymous said...

I love this top, and your tip. My mom used to make all my dad's button down shirts when I was a kid and she used this same method for the yokes. You're right, some of these great construction details are lost with the "new-fangled" patterns and their shortcut directions.

And what is up with this snow??? We got our fair share in Reno too.

The Hojnackes said...

I love the top! The fabric is such a great print!

Sew little time said...

lovely and great tip - thanks!

Jan said...

Great looking top. It is a very pretty print.

Elizabeth Made This said...

What a great top. How nice to have a challis top that pairs so well with jeans but could easily get dressed up too. I lament the lack of spring with you. We've got over a foot of snow in the backyard with 1-4" coming today. Blah.

Diana said...

Great top. Love the fabric and the tips. Cold here too in the Maritimes of Canada

SEWN said...

Cute top. Love the drapiness. Perfect fabric for that pattern.

The Slapdash Sewist said...

Very pretty top! I like how the bias print becomes a straight print on the bias. All sorts of sewing mind tricks.

Helen said...

Great top and I love the print. Some things are worth the pain!

KID, MD said...

Yes, thank you! *Sashays off to the gardens*

KID, MD said...

Thanks! I wish more patterns included it! They're getting lazy...

KID, MD said...

Thank you!

KID, MD said...

I hope so too!! We're getting glimpses of it!

KID, MD said...

Thanks! I definitely think we've lost a lot of techniques due to "streamlined construction". Sad!

KID, MD said...

Thanks! I wasn't in love with it at first, but it's really fun on the bias!

KID, MD said...

Thank you!

KID, MD said...

Thanks!

KID, MD said...

OK, not complaining anymore... Ours is pretty much melted now, but ugh. Snow in April is just wrong.

KID, MD said...

Thanks!
I bet you've got me beat for cold!

KID, MD said...

Thanks!! I'm glad it behaved itself!

KID, MD said...

Right!? I knew only another sewist would appreciate that! :)

KID, MD said...

Definitely!