Saturday, November 5, 2011

Ottobre 01/2009-23

Hey look! Logan really does wear stuff I make him!
It seems like my Logan clothes posts are always unmodeled, but I caught him this time at the park , after thoroughly bribing him with Sonic. And this was still the best picture I got of the pants...
This is yet another version of the elastic waist pants from the 01/2009 issue of Ottobre. I have actually lost count of the number of times I've made these for Logan, but I've traced three different sizes. This pair replaces his last pair of nice-enough-for-chuch pants that he *sigh* blew a hole in the knee of earlier this week. I skipped all of the patches and pockets on the front, since I wanted them to be church-y.
On the back, I used the pocket from pant #23, the "Tarhuri" pant. Logan loves the double pocket and I have yet to meet a boy who doesn't like to play with velcro. Double win, there. I stuck a little bias tape tab into the edgestitching of the pocket, just for fun.
The coolest part of these pants is on the inside. I decided to line them with some soft cotton jersey. The outer fabric is a thinnish twill, and it is getting pretty cold. This monkey fabric is fun, but a little too juvenile for Logan. This way only he knows it's there, but it will help keep him cozy on the playground.

4 comments:

  1. And it's only going to get colder. Good think Logan has a clever Mom who can keep him warm!

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  2. The inside isn't very churchy (: They are so cute, and I'm sure the fun inside fabric makes him smile when he puts them on.

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  3. I love the idea of lining with the jersey. I've never thought of doing that. How did you construct? Treat the lining and outer fabric as 1? Or did you see it into the waistband??? Thanks for your time.

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  4. @Iestra - I cut the lining from the pant pattern, omitting the allowances for the hem and casing, then once pant and lining were constructed (except hem and waist casing), I sandwiched them wrong sides together and turned the casings and the hem over the lining and stitched them in place to attach them together.

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